Landscaping & Lawn Care in Plano
22 Jan 2019
Ken Hyatt

Ken’s Quick Tip: The #1 problem with two-thirds of the lawns in North Texas

This is Village Green’s 39th year in the lawn and landscape business in North Texas (I’m getting old!) Seriously though, I’ve seen a lot of unhealthy lawns over the years with the same common problem. They were not watered properly. Especially during our North Texas winter. I’d go so far as to to say that two-thirds of the underperforming lawns we see have poor watering as the main culprit. That’s a lot of lawns in nearly 40 years of business!

The secret to a great lawn isn’t a great mystery. In fact, it is pretty simple. It takes three things for a lawn to thrive. Sun, water, and fertilizer (and in that order.) Of those three things the two that are easiest for you to control are water and fertilizer. But the kicker is you have to have the water for the fertilizer to work.

If you want a healthy lawn this spring and summer, you need to make sure are watering 12-months out of the year. Even during the North Texas winter. If your lawn hasn’t been thriving in the past more than likely under or poor watering is your main problem. Whether it be improper sprinkler settings, broken sprinkler heads, inadequate water coverage, or simply sprinklers that were turned off for the winter the result is under-watered lawns. It doesn’t matter how much sun or fertilizer they get, without proper year round watering the lawn isn’t going to thrive. Because that is what the water does, it helps spread that fertilizer down into the root system which makes your lawn stronger. That strength will sustain your lawn in the tough North Texas months (winter and summer) when we have extreme temps. That’s why it’s so important to be consistent with your lawn plan and to not forget that after sun (which is mostly beyond our control,) you have to give you lawn water and fertilizer.

If you don’t feel your lawn is as good as it could be give us a call and let us help solve your problem. We offer affordable sprinkler repair by certified technicians and fertilization and weed control packages. If you have the time and are the DIY type, download our free watering guide and make sure your system is set for winter watering. You can also check out our resource center which has free downloadable content (including my secrets to a healthy lawn series.)

I promise if you have the proper watering schedule and follow it up with a proper fertilizer and weed control (we offer affordable plans that will save you time and money,) your lawn will bounce back in no time and end up being the envy of your neighbors.

We’d love to have the opportunity to earn your lawn and fertilization business in 2019! Give us a call at 972-495-6990 or email me at Ken@VillageGreen-Inc.com.

11 Apr 2013

Village Green Talks Video Blog: Weeds!

 

Ken has what we’d call a love hate relationship with weeds. As you’ll see In today’s first ever Green Talks Video Blog (our first, of what we hope are many), Ken knows a LOT about weeds and their control. Here he walks through a customer’s lawn detailing how their weed control program is working. One more thing to note. We apologize for the wind noise in some of this clip. It is very hard to escape the blustery April winds when we are out and about in the field.

09 Apr 2013

Village Green Landscape e-Tour

Village Green Landscape e-Tour from Ken Hyatt on Vimeo.

Ken Hyatt, the founder and owner of Village Green gives a quick e-Tour of a Plano, Texas landscape project.  Ken likes to keep Village Green on the cutting edge, and armed with his smart phone, this e-Tour is an example of one of the many ways he educates and informs our clients in a fun and easy way.

15 Jan 2013

The Only Good Weed is One That Never Grew

What are we doing in January and February to make lawns look great in the spring?  We’re applying a weed preventative to block the weeds before they even start.   

We can’t prevent all weeds from growing but we can prevent a lot of them.  There are basically two types of weeds, the kind that sprout from seeds and those that come back from their roots every year.  Applying a late winter pre-emergent will create a barrier in the soil, blocking most weed seeds from growing which means we only have to spot treat the weeds coming back from their roots.   These treatments while the lawn is dormant cut spring weeds down dramatically – saving time and, more importantly, herbicides.

As usual, St. Augustine is the exception to this because it is very sensitive to chemicals.  Blanket treating a St. Augustine lawn with a weed killer will always stunt its growth so we have to be very gentle with it.  While we do apply a winter pre-emergent to St. Augustine, we apply it at about half the recommended rate.   Our goal with St. Augustine is to make it so happy and healthy with watering and correct fertilizer the rest of the year that during the winter it is too thick for weeds to touch the soil – Mother Nature’s weed control.

The lesson here isn’t “The only good weed is a dead one.”  The real lesson is “The only good weed is one that never grew.”

At Village Green we live by the motto “It’s Easy Being Green”  so if you have outdoor questions, don’t hesitate to contact us or, even better, contact us for a free lawn quote.

01 Aug 2012

Bare Patches in Bermuda

Take a look at these bare patches in the bermuda lawn below.  I see patches like these very frequently, any idea what causes them?  The second photo is a close up of what is causing the problem – rabbit droppings.  The droppings are so acidic they will burn holes through bermuda.  Possible solutions include scattering the droppings with a rake or spraying the area with fox urine (yes, it’s really fox urine).

19 May 2011

One tough weed – Virginia Buttonweed

This is Virginia Buttonweed.  What makes it tough to control is its viney roots underground.    Most weed killers that are labeled for dandelions such as 2-4-D products will control it but you’ll need to make several applications to kill out all of the roots that it has.  It’s this kind of weed that sends most homeowners to the pros.

www.VillageGreen-Inc.com

 

 

19 May 2011

How do you avoid grub damage?

Grub worms can cause serious damage to lawns in late summer.  Until recently we had to wait for the damage before we treated for them but a few years ago a product came out that prevents them before they cause damage.   If you’re going to treat this yourself, don’t just buy the first bag with a grub worm picture.  Look at the label and find one with Imidicloprid as its active ingredient.  The best time to apply is from May through late June.  Doing yourself is fine but if you don’t have time or want to leave it to the lawn care pros go to our website at www.VillageGreen-inc.com or call us.

 

27 Apr 2011

Lawn a weedy mess?

Is your lawn a weedy mess?  There’s still hope!  A north Dallas lawn needs four things to be healthy and lush.  Lots of sun, the correct amount of water, weed control to give the grass room to grow and fertilizer to give it nutrients to sustain the growth.  If you have all four of those things bermuda and St. Augustine will grow on concrete.  Really.  The photos below are of a Richardson lawn that we began treating late last spring.  When we began it had more weeds than grass.  This year it’s the best looking lawn on the block.

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20 Apr 2011

Fescue is a good choice for a shade grass

Fescue is a good choice for grass in the shade.  The tough part is you it has to be planted by seed (Fescue sod is expensive and hard to find) and you have to plant it when you’re not normally thinking about your landscape – fall and late winter.  The best fescue lawns I have seen have been by homeowners who every October and February throw more seed out.  Consistently planting the seed will keep the lawn reasonably thick.  Using fescue means you won’t fertilize in the summer and you will be limited in the pre-emergents you can use.  This Fairview lawn looks really nice.

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19 Apr 2011

St. Augustine still shows freeze damage

Here’s an example of freeze damage to a St. Augustine lawn in richardson probably from radiating off of the concrete.  We’re going to use an 18-46-0 fertilizer made from dimonium phosphate to help the roots recover.  We’re using this type of fertilizer instead of the normal ammonium nitrate because brown patch feeds off of nitrogen from normal fertilizer.  This is a little more expensive for us to use but the results are worth it.

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