Landscaping & Lawn Care in Plano
19 Jun 2020

Who are the best lawn care service companies in North Dallas?

Looking for a reputable lawn care and landscape company in North Dallas? Below is a list of some of the best in North Dallas.

Lawntech
Founded in 1985, Lawntech is still around today because of their old school customer service. They are a very conscientious company that doesn’t overload their applicators with work. That way their lawn technicians are able to take the time needed in each year. They also have invested over the years in good equipment and offer solid lawn programs.

Cititurf
Cititurf is a busy lawn care company that does a lot of volume. They have extremely knowledgeable managers who are able to offer great support which allows them to have great lawn technicians (to handle their volume.) In addition they keep up with the latest products to make sure they are getting the best results for their customers. They also have good, up-to-date equipment and offer good lawn programs for their customers.

Image Lawn and Landscape
Founded in 1995, Image Lawn and Landscape is a full-service lawn and landscape company handling both residential, commercial and homeowner association customers. Like the others on this list, they have stayed up-to-date with technology and equipment and offer professionalism and a good value.

When hiring a new lawn service company it is important to ask the right questions to compare services. Here are five signs that a lawn care company is a good choice.

1. Compare Standard Lawn Treatments.
Compare treatment programs from lawn company to company. Do they provide both grass care and ornamental tree and shrub care? Are lawn care treatments tailored to specific types of grass? For example, what makes your neighbor’s grass thrive won’t necessarily be what your grass needs. Look for statements about how treatments benefit lawns, trees and shrubs. You don’t want a one size fits all mentality.

2. Go Beyond Yard Maintenance.
The needs of your yard can change from season to season, year to year. Just like you wouldn’t go to a dentist who only does cleanings, you want to hire a lawn care company that can provide additional services when you need them.

At a minimum these should include diagnosis and treatment of diseases and pests, and service calls between regular lawn treatments if you notice a problem.

3. Know Who is Treating Your Lawn
When it comes to lawn care technician training, the more the better. This goes for not just knowing how to apply grass treatments properly and safely. They should also be able (and willing) to answer questions you have about your treatments, your yard’s basic needs and how you can meet them, and alert you to anything you need to keep an eye on.

When it comes to the techs themselves, the fewer the better – at least in terms of who treats your property. You’re better served by having the same dedicated technician or tech team visit after visit. That way they get to really know your yard and can stay on top of any problem areas.

4. Look for Preventative Lawn Care Service
What tips and information do they give to lawn service customers? Depending on where you live, there are certain pests, lawn diseases and other problems that can crop up with lawns, trees and shrubs. When you know what to watch for, you’re able to contact your lawn care company for a service call so the problem can be diagnosed and treated before damage is done.

5. Check Customer Reviews.
Check out the experiences of other customers. Consumer services like Angie’s List and Google for your region are great sources of information on lawn company performance and customer satisfaction. By doing your homework you can narrow the field of companies. The next step is to talk with the lawn care services that made your short list. That’s your opportunity to ask questions and get answers you didn’t find on their websites. While the specifics of quality lawn care vary from region to region, ask these questions to guide you in making the right choice.

08 Jun 2020

Summer Watering Guide

Now is the time to program your sprinkler controller for summer watering to make sure your lawn and landscape are getting adequate water coverage.

How much should you water in the summer?

The starting point for our watering plan is summer because that is the season your soil loses the most water. During summer we recommend watering roughly an hour per week per zone in full sun. We also recommend watering in 10-minute bursts, so your lawn has time to absorb the water. If you water more than that, you run the risk of the water running down your street or alley because of our infamous clay soil in North Texas.

This means in summer we recommend that you water in ten minutes bursts two days per week at 2 am, 4 am, and 6 am.

The reason we recommend watering at these times is that it is cooler, which means less evaporation. There is also less wind that can blow your water onto your driveway, sidewalk or street. If you water as recommended, you will have more water that ends up in your lawn, which is both environmentally and financially smart.

Some of the newer controllers have what is called a seasonal adjust section. Those are really easy to use with this system. If you have shady areas in your lawn, you typically need to water about half the recommended time you would in a sunny area.

Important Note for Rotary Head Sprinklers and Drip Systems.

Rotary Head Sprinklers (they slowly turn and send out long streams of water.) We recommend running them twice as long because it takes them longer to put out the same amount of water.

Drip Zones (drip systems work by maintaining a level of moisture in the soil.) They can be tricky because they put out water at different rates, and the water going into the ground can vary based on how the drip hoses are installed. We recommend that they run daily or close to it (roughly 10 minutes per day in the summer.) It is important to pay attention to your beds to make sure they are getting the proper amount of water.

Download Summer Watering Guide

If you need help with programming your sprinkler or have any other issues give us a call at 972-495-6990 or Ken@VillageGreen-Inc.com. We offer affordable sprinkler repair by our certified irrigation technicians. You can also watch this quick video where Ken shows you how to properly program your sprinkler controller.

13 Feb 2013

Mid-Winter Crepe Myrtle Pruning – Don’t Believe Your Neighbors

It’s late winter and all your neighbors are trimming their crepe myrtles so I thought I’d share a quick tip on how to trim yours.  Here it is…Don’t do it.  Or if you really feel the need, do it gently.  The best way to trim your crepe myrtles is to treat them like your large trees by trimming them very little.  You wouldn’t consider topping your oak tree at 20’, yet this time of year when you look down your block, most of your neighbors are whacking off their crepe myrtles at about 6’ tall and telling you they’re going to bloom better.   A few years ago I watched someone using a circular saw proudly cutting through limbs 3” thick.  

 Your neighbors are creating big, ugly knots on the trunks of their crepe myrtles and the few extra blooms your neighbors are getting will be on the end of thin, spindly limbs too weak to support the weight of the blooms, making the limbs droop. 

 How should you trim a crepe myrtle?  Trim off limbs rubbing against each other or rubbing your roof.  If you really feel the need to prune more, don’t trim off anything larger than a pencil.  Want to see what good pruning looks like?  Go to the Dallas Arboretum and check out their crepe myrtles.  The crepe myrtles are used during their tour for the blind because of the beautiful sculpted feel of their untrimmed trunks.    

In our business the yearly sawing that your neighbors are doing isn’t called “pruning”, it’s called “crepe murder” and the punishment is a really ugly tree.

 
19 May 2011

One tough weed – Virginia Buttonweed

This is Virginia Buttonweed.  What makes it tough to control is its viney roots underground.    Most weed killers that are labeled for dandelions such as 2-4-D products will control it but you’ll need to make several applications to kill out all of the roots that it has.  It’s this kind of weed that sends most homeowners to the pros.

www.VillageGreen-Inc.com

 

 

19 May 2011

How do you avoid grub damage?

Grub worms can cause serious damage to lawns in late summer.  Until recently we had to wait for the damage before we treated for them but a few years ago a product came out that prevents them before they cause damage.   If you’re going to treat this yourself, don’t just buy the first bag with a grub worm picture.  Look at the label and find one with Imidicloprid as its active ingredient.  The best time to apply is from May through late June.  Doing yourself is fine but if you don’t have time or want to leave it to the lawn care pros go to our website at www.VillageGreen-inc.com or call us.

 

27 Apr 2011

Lawn a weedy mess?

Is your lawn a weedy mess?  There’s still hope!  A north Dallas lawn needs four things to be healthy and lush.  Lots of sun, the correct amount of water, weed control to give the grass room to grow and fertilizer to give it nutrients to sustain the growth.  If you have all four of those things bermuda and St. Augustine will grow on concrete.  Really.  The photos below are of a Richardson lawn that we began treating late last spring.  When we began it had more weeds than grass.  This year it’s the best looking lawn on the block.

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20 Apr 2011

Fescue is a good choice for a shade grass

Fescue is a good choice for grass in the shade.  The tough part is you it has to be planted by seed (Fescue sod is expensive and hard to find) and you have to plant it when you’re not normally thinking about your landscape – fall and late winter.  The best fescue lawns I have seen have been by homeowners who every October and February throw more seed out.  Consistently planting the seed will keep the lawn reasonably thick.  Using fescue means you won’t fertilize in the summer and you will be limited in the pre-emergents you can use.  This Fairview lawn looks really nice.

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19 Apr 2011

St. Augustine still shows freeze damage

Here’s an example of freeze damage to a St. Augustine lawn in richardson probably from radiating off of the concrete.  We’re going to use an 18-46-0 fertilizer made from dimonium phosphate to help the roots recover.  We’re using this type of fertilizer instead of the normal ammonium nitrate because brown patch feeds off of nitrogen from normal fertilizer.  This is a little more expensive for us to use but the results are worth it.

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